Russ created his one man frontier band, which he dubs, the only full sized sounding band in Alaska that will fit inside a single engine plane. He plays 14 instruments, including harmonica, piano, bass and guitar, and busts out as many different instruments as he can travel with during shows.


RNZ: One-man Alaskan band

Colin Peacock interviews a survivalist and ukulele virtuoso from Fairbanks, Alaska, who makes his second visit here for masterclasses, workshops and concerts in Auckland, and plays two songs live on his ukulele, U-bass, loopers, and harmonica.



HorizonThink: Russell Copelin (Ukulele Russ) in Kalamunda, Western Australia

Known for both his musical workshop and live performance ability Russ leaves a lasting impression and motivation with participants and audiences. The workshop in Kalamunda sold out several days before the event.



Central Maine: Ukulele Russ to perform

Russ plays the axe (or, as he refers to the diminutive instrument, the hatchet) and he does some innovative stuff with a loop pedal and a bass ukulele that he secures to a stand with DeWalt clamps. Also, he’s an engaging storyteller.



Central Maine: Maine native returns to uke it up.

Everybody has this preconceived notion that I’m going to be singing songs about beaches and rainbows and playing all happy songs. That’s really what people think about when they think ukulele — ‘Aww, it’s that cute little guitar from Hawaii.' Instead, he brings rock, blues, tongue-in-cheek and a catalog as varied as “You’re the One,” a sweet song to his wife, Dixmont native Lindsey, to “Two Ply,” a Stevie Wonder-ish ode to toilet paper.



Midland Reporter: Ukulele Russ from Alaska set to entertain in Kalamunda

It’s quite unusual for international ukulele players to visit Perth, let alone Kalamunda, so the visit is quite unique and being looked forward to by many music fans and uke players. He [Copelin] is a great live performer, chatty, he can play at least 14 instruments and creates material on the spot.





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